Monthly Archives: March 2020

Manage Anxiety & Stress Series, Part 3 – For Responders and Those Released from Quarantine

As we continue to venture into the unknown around the COVID-19 pandemic, one thing is already becoming quite apparent, the impact on mental health. We are featuring a series of three articles, based on information from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), that address tips to deal with anxiety and stress, as well as identifying those among us that may be at a higher risk.

For Responders

Responding to COVID-19 can take an emotional toll on you. There are things you can do to reduce secondary traumatic stress (STS) reactions:

  • Acknowledge that STS can impact anyone helping families after a traumatic event.
  • Learn the symptoms including physical (fatigue, illness) and mental (fear, withdrawal, guilt).
  • Allow time for you and your family to recover from responding to the pandemic.
  • Create a menu of personal self-care activities that you enjoy, such as spending time with friends and family, exercising, or reading a book.
  • Take a break from media coverage of COVID-19.
  • Ask for help if you feel overwhelmed or concerned that COVID-19 is affecting your ability to care for your family and patients as you did before the outbreak.

Learn more tips for taking care of yourself during emergency response at https://emergency.cdc.gov/coping/responders.asp.

For People Who Have Been Released from Quarantine

Being separated from others if a healthcare provider thinks you may have been exposed to COVID-19 can be stressful, even if you do not get sick. Everyone feels differently after coming out of quarantine. Some feelings include:

  • Mixed emotions, including relief after quarantine
  • Fear and worry about your own health and the health of your loved ones
  • Stress from the experience of monitoring yourself or being monitored by others for signs and symptoms of COVID-19
  • Sadness, anger, or frustration because friends or loved ones have unfounded fears of contracting the disease from contact with you, even though you have been determined not to be contagious
  • Guilt about not being able to perform normal work or parenting duties during quarantine
  • Other emotional or mental health changes

Children may also feel upset or have other strong emotions if they, or someone they know, has been released from quarantine. For more information on how you can help your child cope, please see our blog post Manage Anxiety & Stress Series, Part 2-For Parents.

If you, or someone you care about, are feeling overwhelmed with emotions like sadness, depression, or anxiety, feel like you want to harm yourself or others, or need additional help call:

For the complete article as well additional information on managing anxiety and stress, please visit https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prepare/managing-stress-anxiety.html.

Manage Anxiety & Stress Series, Part 2 – For Parents

As we continue to venture into the unknown around the COVID-19 pandemic, one thing is already becoming quite apparent, the impact on mental health. We are featuring a series of three articles, based on information from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), that address tips to deal with anxiety and stress, as well as identifying those among us that may be at a higher risk.

Children and teens react, in part, on what they see from the adults around them. When parents and caregivers deal with the COVID-19 calmly and confidently, they can provide the best support for their children. Parents can be more reassuring to others around them, especially children, if they are better prepared.

Not all children and teens respond to stress in the same way. Some common changes to watch for include:

  • Excessive crying or irritation in younger children
  • Returning to behaviors they have outgrown (for example, toileting accidents or bedwetting)
  • Excessive worry or sadness
  • Unhealthy eating or sleeping habits
  • Irritability and “acting out” behaviors in teens
  • Poor school performance or avoiding school
  • Difficulty with attention and concentration
  • Avoidance of activities enjoyed in the past
  • Unexplained headaches or body pain
  • Use of alcohol, tobacco, or other drugs

There are many things you can do to support your child:

  • Take time to talk with your child or teen about the COVID-19 outbreak. Answer questions and share facts about COVID-19 in a way that your child or teen can understand.
  • Reassure your child or teen that they are safe. Let them know it is ok if they feel upset. Share with them how you deal with your own stress so that they can learn how to cope from you.
  • Limit your family’s exposure to news coverage of the event, including social media. Children may misinterpret what they hear and can be frightened about something they do not understand.
  • Try to keep up with regular routines. If schools are closed, create a schedule for learning activities and relaxing or fun activities.
  • Be a role model.  Take breaks, get plenty of sleep, exercise, and eat well. Connect with your friends and family members.

Learn more about helping children cope at https://www.cdc.gov/childrenindisasters/helping-children-cope.html.

If you, or someone you care about, are feeling overwhelmed with emotions like sadness, depression, or anxiety, feel like you want to harm yourself or others, or need additional help call:

For the complete article as well additional information on managing anxiety and stress, please visit https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prepare/managing-stress-anxiety.html.

Manage Anxiety & Stress Series, Part 1

As we continue to venture into the unknown around the COVID-19 pandemic, one thing is already becoming quite apparent, the impact on mental health. We are featuring a series of three articles, based on information from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), that address tips to deal with anxiety and stress, as well as identifying those among us that may be at a higher risk.

The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) may be stressful for people. Fear and anxiety about a disease can be overwhelming and cause strong emotions in adults and children. Coping with stress will make you, the people you care about, and your community stronger.

Everyone reacts differently to stressful situations.  How you respond to the outbreak can depend on your background, the things that make you different from other people, and the community you live in.

People who may respond more strongly to the stress of a crisis include:

  • Older people and people with chronic diseases who are at higher risk for COVID-19
  • Children and teens
  • People who are helping with the response to COVID-19, like doctors and other health care providers, or first responders
  • People who have mental health conditions including problems with substance use

Stress during an infectious disease outbreak can include:

  • Fear and worry about your own health and the health of your loved ones
  • Changes in sleep or eating patterns
  • Difficulty sleeping or concentrating
  • Worsening of chronic health problems
  • Increased use of alcohol, tobacco, or other drugs

People with preexisting mental health conditions should continue with their treatment and be aware of new or worsening symptoms. Additional information can be found at the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration website, https://www.samhsa.gov/disaster-preparedness.

Taking care of yourself, your friends, and your family can help you cope with stress. Helping others cope with their stress can also make your community stronger.

Things you can do to support yourself:

  • Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including social media. Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting.
  • Take care of your body. Take deep breaths, stretch, or meditate. Try to eat healthy, well-balanced meals, exercise regularly, get plenty of sleep, and avoid alcohol and drugs.
  • Make time to unwind. Try to do some other activities you enjoy.
  • Connect with others. Talk with people you trust about your concerns and how you are feeling.

Call your healthcare provider if stress gets in the way of your daily activities for several days in a row.

Reduce stress in yourself and others by sharing the facts about COVID-19 and understanding the actual risk to yourself and people you care about can make an outbreak less stressful.

When you share accurate information about COVID-19 you can help make people feel less stressed and allow you to connect with them.

Learn more about taking care of your emotional health at https://emergency.cdc.gov/coping/selfcare.asp.

If you, or someone you care about, are feeling overwhelmed with emotions like sadness, depression, or anxiety, feel like you want to harm yourself or others, or need additional help call:

For the complete article as well additional information on managing anxiety and stress, please visit https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prepare/managing-stress-anxiety.html.

Primrose Precautionary Measures Regarding COVID-19 as of March 17, 2020

COVID-19_blogArt-3-17Primrose is utilizing recommendations from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and local and state health departments to implement precautionary measures against COVID-19 (Coronavirus).  We have detailed plans in place in each of our communities for COVID-19.  Our staff are trained in infection control practices and following those protocols every day.

The health and wellness of our residents continues to be our top priority.  We are being proactive in efforts to prevent the virus from entering our communities.  Below is a list of protocols we have implemented in all our Primrose communities:

  • There will be one point of entry (main entrance) into our communities.
  • Access is restricted to employees, essential third-party medical providers, and family members (wearing masks and limited to the resident’s apartment) during certain pre-approved situations such as end of life care.
  • All persons authorized to enter our community will immediately clean their hands using alcohol-based sanitizer and be screened using a questionnaire and temperature check.
  • We encourage family members to communicate with loved ones via phone calls, emails, video chat, or other remote options.
  • There will be daily screening of all Primrose residents.
  • Transportation will be provided only to medically necessary appointments (as determined by leadership team in coordination with medical professionals).
  • We will be providing meal delivery for all residents capable of dining in their apartments. There is no fee for this delivery.  Additional dining modifications will be made for those who require it.
  • All group activities have been cancelled. Alternative options are being developed and offered.
  • Vendor deliveries will be made to outside zones for staff to deliver.
  • Infection control practices, including frequent cleaning and sanitization, are being followed.

For more information on COVID-19, please visit www.cdc.gov.

Thank you for your cooperation as we all work together to keep our residents safe.  If you should have any questions, please contact your local Primrose community to speak with the Executive Director.

Primrose Precautionary Measures Regarding COVID-19 as of March 16, 2020

COVID-19_blogArt-3-16March 16, 2020 – Primrose is utilizing recommendations from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and local and state health departments to implement precautionary measures against COVID-19 (Coronavirus).  We have detailed plans in place in each of our communities for COVID-19.  Our staff are trained in infection control practices and following those protocols every day.

The health and wellness of our residents continues to be our top priority.  We are being proactive in efforts to prevent the virus from entering our communities.  Below is a list of protocols we have implemented in all our Primrose communities:

  • There will be one point of entry (main entrance) into our communities.
  • Access is restricted to employees, essential third-party medical providers, and family members (wearing masks and limited to the resident’s apartment) during certain situations such as end of life care. We encourage family members to communicate with loved ones via phone calls, emails, video chat, or other remote options.
  • All persons entering our community will immediately clean their hands using alcohol-based sanitizer and be screened.
  • All incoming Primrose employees will be screened upon returning for their scheduled shift.
  • There will be daily screening of all Primrose residents.
  • Transportation will be provided only to medically necessary appointments (as determined by leadership team).
  • We will be utilizing complimentary tray services for all meals and modifying community dining options.
  • All group activities have been cancelled. Alternative options are being developed and offered.
  • Vendor deliveries will be made to outside zones for staff to deliver.
  • Infection control practices, including frequent cleaning and sanitization, are being followed.

For more information on COVID-19, please visit www.cdc.gov.

Primrose Precautionary Measures Regarding COVID-19 as of March 13, 2020

COVID-19_blogArt-3-13-20_300x200

3/13/2020:  All Primrose communities are restricted to employees, essential third-party medical providers, and family members in certain situations such as end of life care.

All incoming Primrose employees will be screened upon returning for their scheduled shift.

Primrose highly encourages residents to stay home as much as possible to further reduce their risk of being exposed.  However, all residents returning from an outing will also be screened.

 

3/12/2020:  Primrose is utilizing recommendations from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and local and state health departments to implement precautionary measures against COVID-19 (Coronavirus).  We have detailed plans in place in each of our communities for COVID-19.  Our staff are trained in infection control practices and following those protocols every day.

The health and wellness of our residents continues to be our top priority.  We are having regular communication with residents, their families, our staff members, visitors, and vendors regarding our visit restrictions and the required precautionary measures in place.

The top priority at this point is to be proactive in efforts to prevent the virus from entering our communities.  All visitation is limited to certain situations such as end of life care or when a visitor is essential for the resident’s emotional well-being and care.  All public events and routine social visits will not be allowed at this time.  We encourage family members to communicate with loved ones via phone calls, emails, video chat, or other remote options.

To help us prevent the spread of communicable disease, including COVID-19, please DO NOT VISIT our communities if any of the following apply:

  • You have traveled within the last 14 days outside of the United States or to areas affected by COVID-19.
  • You have signs or symptoms of respiratory infection, such as fever, cough, shortness of breath, sore throat, or a temperature above 100.4 degrees.
  • You have been on a cruise ship in the past 14 days.
  • In the past 14 days, you have had contact with someone with a confirmed diagnosis or under investigation for COVID-19.
  • You reside or work in a complex where community-based spread of COVID-19 is occurring.

There will be one point of entry (main entrance) at this time.  All essential visitors who meet the screening protocols above will immediately be asked to clean their hands using alcohol-based sanitizer.  Movement inside the community will be limited.

For more information on COVID-19, please visit the CDC website.

Thank you for your cooperation as we all work together to keep our residents safe.  If you should have any questions, please contact your local Primrose community to speak with the Executive Director.

Primrose Precautionary Measures Regarding COVID-19 as of March 12, 2020

COVID-19_blogArtPrimrose is utilizing recommendations from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and local and state health departments to implement precautionary measures against COVID-19 (Coronavirus).  We have detailed plans in place in each of our communities for COVID-19.  Our staff are trained in infection control practices and following those protocols every day.

The health and wellness of our residents continues to be our top priority.  We are having regular communication with residents, their families, our staff members, visitors, and vendors regarding our visit restrictions and the required precautionary measures in place.

The top priority at this point is to be proactive in efforts to prevent the virus from entering our communities.  All visitation is limited to certain situations such as end of life care or when a visitor is essential for the resident’s emotional well-being and care.  All public events and routine social visits will not be allowed at this time.  We encourage family members to communicate with loved ones via phone calls, emails, video chat, or other remote options.

To help us prevent the spread of communicable disease, including COVID-19, please DO NOT VISIT our communities if any of the following apply:

  • You have traveled within the last 14 days outside of the United States or to areas affected by COVID-19.
  • You have signs or symptoms of respiratory infection, such as fever, cough, shortness of breath, sore throat, or a temperature above 100.4 degrees.
  • You have been on a cruise ship in the past 14 days.
  • In the past 14 days, you have had contact with someone with a confirmed diagnosis or under investigation for COVID-19.
  • You reside or work in a complex where community-based spread of COVID-19 is occurring.

There will be one point of entry (main entrance) at this time.  All essential visitors who meet the screening protocols above will immediately be asked to clean their hands using alcohol-based sanitizer.  Movement inside the community will be limited.

For more information on COVID-19, please visit the CDC website.

Thank you for your cooperation as we all work together to keep our residents safe.  If you should have any questions, please contact your local Primrose community to speak with the Executive Director.