Monthly Archives: August 2016

Therapy Dogs Visit Mankato Primrose

The residents of Primrose watching the dogs preform tricks.

The residents of Primrose watching the dogs preform tricks.

“Dogs laugh, but they laugh with their tails.”

This past month the residents of Primrose in Mankato enjoyed the company of Therapy Dogs International group. Plenty of laughs and tail wagging was shared that day. Six different dogs from the Therapy Dogs International group joined us for an afternoon of fun to show us some tricks and keep us company.

Therapy Dogs International is a volunteer organization that is dedicated to regulating, testing and registering therapy dogs. All breeds can be therapy dogs.

Elizabeth, Helen and Marcia enjoying the therapy dogs.

Elizabeth, Helen and Marcia enjoying the therapy dogs at the Mankato Primrose.

The residents enjoyed seeing the variety of dogs that the group brought in. The group of owners were very informative and discussed the process of becoming a therapy dog. The dog owners also explained what kind of dog they have, age, breed, and other fun facts about their beloved animals.

Many of the residents here at Primrose of Mankato are animal lovers, and many grew up with dogs! The residents enjoyed the company of the therapy dogs and are looking forward to the next time they come back!

Anderson Primrose Residents Take Road Trip to Cincannati

Primrose residents and staff enjoying an outing to Cincinnatti

Primrose residents and staff enjoying an outing to Cincinnatti

Some of the ladies at Primrose Retirement Community of Anderson decided to take an overnight trip to Cincinnati, OH. While there the group checked out the famous Fabulous Furs just across the river in Kentucky and went home with some very soft and nice furs – and they even found them on sale!

While there they went on the riverboat cruise. Marjorie Steiner had this to say about her experience on the trip – “The only word in which to describe our riverboat dinner and wine tasting cruise on the Ohio River, is AWESOME!! The food, scenery, dinner, and wine tasting was absolutely amazing. I got to enjoy something very nice and got to laugh with part of my Primrose family and that was outstanding. I cannot wait to go again soon!”

The ladies came back to Primrose with nothing but smiles on their faces and gratitude that we were able to take them to do something that they will always cherish and remember.

Anderson Primrose Residents Let ‘Inner’ Artist Out

Anderson residents showing off their artwork

Anderson Primrose residents showing off their artwork

We at Primrose of Anderson like to be creative, laugh, joke, and come up with new things we can try. For our latest project, we decided to get a canvas, some paint, and some balloons! We filled balloons full of different paint colors, tacked the balloons to the canvas, and threw a dart at them. The balloons would then explode with color all over the canvas. This created a mix of different splatters of paint and colors.

One of the residents even went and finger painted part of hers just so she could add even more flare to it. By the end we had paint all over our hands, clothes, and the gazebo area! The laughter we all got to enjoy with each other over paint and canvas will be a moment we won’t forget. After it was all done and cleaned up (as best we could) they thanked and hugged staff. We are currently planning a place in the life enrichment lounge to hang them up, so everyone can enjoy the artwork that we created.

Stillwater Primrose Resident Spotlight – Jewell (Bradley) Raney

Don and Jewell (Bradley) Raney

Don and Jewell (Bradley) Raney

At the age of three weeks, baby Jewell Bradley made the trip in a covered wagon from Harrison, Arkansas, to the New Home Community at Pryor, Oklahoma. Her father had worked for the railroad in Arkansas, but he became a farmer in Oklahoma.

Jewell spent her growing up years in the New Home Community and graduated from High School at Pryor. Soon after graduation she went to work for the Southwestern Bell Telephone Company as a switchboard operator. Her sister, Kathryn and her husband, Tom LaFoilette, had moved to Richland, Washington, where LaFoilette worked for the DuPont Company as a construction engineer. He contacted Jewell asking her and her other sister, Connie to come to Washington and help them when their baby was born.

Jewell and Sister Connie boarded the MK&T train in route to the state of Washington. Jewell said, “It was during the war about 1943, and there were lots of soldiers on the train going home on leave. A couple of the boys took a shine to my sister and me and we had dinner with them. They were very nice to us and visiting with them made the long trip go faster.”

After her sister’s baby was born, the brother-in-law asked Jewell if she wanted to stay with them in Richland and he would get her a job with DuPont. She agreed and was hired on as a switchboard operator for the company.

Nuclear reactor B under construction,    Hanford Project, September 1943

Nuclear reactor B under construction,
Hanford Project, September 1943


Jewell said that the Hanford Project was out in the desert where different building sites were situated a good distance from each other. The telephone company identified these sites by the names of trees like Hemlock, Alder, Pine, Juniper and fir. The company had an evacuation plan in case of an explosion or other catastrophe. As switchboard operator she had certain things to do in case of an evacuation. She said, “We had an evacuation drill one day at one of the strategic areas. I unplugged all my connections cutting off all calls immediately. I had a paper showing me where to connect the sites with tree names to places like Washington DC, the War Department, etc… Fortunately we never did really have to evacuate and the drill went fine.”

In 1944, they moved to Jeffersonville, Indiana, where DuPont had a contract to build a rocket fuel plant. Jewell called it “rocket powder.”
Before WWII was over, Jewell moved home to Pryor where she worked at the First Baptist Church as the Office Secretary. Her future husband, Don Raney owned a grocery store in Pryor. Her mother encouraged her to go purchase some groceries and meet the guy. Jewell minded her momma and soon after they began to date. About one and a half years later they were married.

Jewell (Bradley) Raney

Jewell (Bradley) Raney

Don left the grocery business and went to work in Seminole for Atlantic Richfield Oil Co. By then they had a little girl and a son was born in Seminole. The family stayed in Seminole, raised their children there. When their daughter was in high school, Jewell went to college at East Central in Ada, receiving her teaching degree. She taught second grade for fourteen years at Seminole.

Jewell’s husband, Don, came home one day after a fine day of fishing. He complained of chest pains so they went to the emergency room. He died there of a heart attack. Her daughter is deceased also. Her son is an engineer working for Toyota Automobile Co. in Dallas, Texas.

Following an illness, Jewell’s doctor said that she should not be living alone so she moved to Primrose Retirement Center, Shawnee, Oklahoma. She is very alert and active, loves the Lord. “It has been a good life and I have been blessed,” she said.

So, Jewell Bradley Raney has come from the covered wagon to Oklahoma; Oklahoma to Washington State and the atomic bomb; Indiana and the rocket fuel plant; back to Oklahoma and second graders-all in 94 years. A great adventure!

Helping Your Loved Ones Leave a Legacy

_K0C5921As they age, seniors can find it a particularly difficult task to keep their lives in order.  Their possessions and memories increase over time and the desire to leave a legacy behind for loved ones can be a strong one.  In fact, when selling a home and relocating to a retirement community, the issue of legacy can become a source of stress.  Our aging loved ones want to leave behind more than just eBay auction items and Goodwill giveaways – they want to leave their stories, their knowledge, and their skills for others to benefit from.  Here are some things you can do to ensure your loved ones that they will be remembered and appreciated for generations to come:

Set Up the Video Camera

Next time you are at a family get-together, ask your loved ones to tell their story.  How did they meet?  Where did they grow up?  What is their favorite memory about each of their children?  What advice would they give a young person just starting out in life?  Ask them for information that you can capture, preserve, and share with your kids and grandkids. They will likely be happy to take the time to reminisce – and you will have created something that will honor and respect them as well as preserving your family heritage well into the future.

Gather Up Favorite Recipes

Sift through the old recipe cards in the kitchen.  Take your favorites to the local printer and ask if they can copy them onto 8.5×11 sheets of binder paper.  Purchase three-ring binders and make recipe books for all of the kids/grandkids.  Many great family traditions are built around food – and this is a great way to preserve them.

Don’t Forget the Photos

Perhaps the most powerful way to look back on the lives of our aging loved ones is through photos and mementoes.  Consider working with them to put together personalized albums for children and grandchildren with photos and mementoes specific to them and their time together with their parents/grandparents.  Preserving the fond memories of the past, and continuing to capture them as they happen now, will result in a cherished gift filled with indelible moments.

If you or a loved one would like to talk about what it means to move to a retirement community, Primrose would be honored to assist.  Just visit www.primroseretirement.com for more info.